Welcome To The Website Of The New York State Administrative Law Judges Association


Established in 1976, the New York State Administrative Law Judges Association (NYSALJA) is a state affiliate chapter of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary (NAALJ). Our mission is to advocate and to advance the highest standards of neutrality and fairness among administrative law judges in the hearing and decision making process and to avoid any form of bias or discrimination. The objectives of the NYSALJA include promoting and advocating for improvements in the administrative process and procedures together with studying and comparing administrative law and practice in New York and other jurisdictions.

For more information you may contact Anne Murphy, Treasurer or Ruth Kraft, President.



News, Articles & Announcements
of Interest to Hearing Officers and Administrative Law Judges

Spring Cleaning – Tidying Up Your Smartphone Address Book

April 23, 2015 by · Comments Off
Filed under: Technology 

imagesThe Wall Street Journal’s, Joanna Stern, writes in her personal technology column about streamlining your address book with the help of some software tools and a contact cleanup plan. Great advice on creating a single, cloud-based address book you can access on all your devices.

ALJs and Performing Weddings

April 16, 2015 by · Comments Off
Filed under: ALJs & the Law 

Dear NYSALJA, I’m a full time ALJ with a NYS agency. I’ve been asked to officiate a wedding and would like to know whether, as ALJs, we have that authority. I appreciate any guidance you can provide.

Dear Judge, the short answer is that in New York State, ALJs are not authorized to perform marriages. Many judges are but, regrettably, state administrative law judges are not among them.

Currently, the only judges who are permitted to do so are federal district court judges for the northern, southern, eastern or western district of New York, a judge of the United States Court of International Trade, a federal administrative law judge presiding in this state, a judge or justice of the Unified Court System of this State, a housing judge of the civil court of the city of New York, or a retired judge or justice of the Unified Court System or a retired housing judge of the civil court.

For a full look at the statute that regulates this area of the law, please refer to New York Domestic Relations – Article 3 – § 11.

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